Lowell House CEO Bill Garr to step down next month

Retirement


Lowell House CEO Bill Garr dedicated the nonprofit’s new lobby to donor Nancy Donahue in a ceremony on November 13, 2019. (Material photograph of the sun)

Lowell — Bill Garr, who served as CEO of Lowell House Addiction Treatment and Recovery for 10 years, will continue to do so next month as he prepares to be replaced by Nashua Soup Kitchen executive director Michael Reinke. resign from the job.

Garr’s final day at Lowell House will be July 3, and Reinke will become CEO on July 5. Garr said Friday he was proud of how the nonprofit has grown during his decade-long tenure as CEO.

“We are a $10 million agency that has grown a lot in 10 years,” Garr said. “Ten years ago, we had less than $1 million in assets. At this point, it’s a complex midsize agency.”

Garr said Lowell House was on the brink of bankruptcy at the time, but was financially stable. Aside from a two-month shutdown, Lowell House has not cut staff or scaled back its services or programs during the COVID-19 pandemic, he said.

In August of this year, Garr said he expected a modest 27-unit apartment complex at 555 Merrimack Street to open for people with substance abuse disorders, an effort he said had been underway for nine years. Stated.

Garr’s decision to retire was “a good time to quit,” he said, with the organization in the hands of talented staff. Garr, who has been CEO of five different agencies for 50 years, said it was time to spend more time with his family.

“I think it’s time to bring in younger talent and people with different skills to move the agency forward,” Garr said.

Reinke was executive director of Nashua Soup Kitchen and Shelter for seven years, during which time he raised more than $9 million in capital efforts to build much-needed new shelters.

“Since around 1987, I have been working with the most at-risk people in the field of welfare services,” Reinke said Friday. “This is a great next step for me and most importantly, a place where I feel I can really make a difference.”

Reinke said he wants Lowell House to be more involved with the community and is looking to improve some of the organization’s facilities.

“The facility at 101 Jackson St. is a great facility and looks really great. It would be great if all of our facilities reflected their presence and physical standards to support the people who visit us.” said Mr. Reinke.

In a written statement, Chairman of the Board John Kurland praised Garr’s stay at Lowell House.

“Bill’s ability to strategically plan our trajectory of service to our clients, develop a great team to execute these strategies, and keep the agency financially sound over the years will be a tremendous asset to Lowell and the local community.” It’s a true legacy of Bill,” Kurland said. “As the chairman once said, he sought to move us forward into the future as a ‘force to be reckoned with’ in recovery.”

Kurland also said the board is pleased to welcome Reinke as the new CEO to build on Garr’s success.

“We believe Mike brings the dedication, experience, personality and collaboration needed to lead LHATR into its next phase of growth,” Kurland said.

Lowell House staff and executives plan to celebrate Garr’s retirement on July 15 at Café Escadrille in Burlington. If you are interested in participating, please call Silvia Dominguez-Bodie (781-296-6275) for more information.

Lowell House first opened in 1971 with a mission to help rebuild the lives of people recovering from substance abuse disorders. They offer both internment and outpatient programs, counseling, and re-entry programs for those released from prison.



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