First Responders Gather to Demand Changes to Retirement Allowance System

Retirement


Hundreds of first responders gathered in state legislatures on Tuesday to urge lawmakers to correct what they say is a mistake in the retirement plan. Funds to address this issue have just been removed from the budget. This issue dates back to changes made to the scheme in 2011. To close the hole in the state budget, about 1,800 civil servants who have not yet been vested have had their benefits cut and the retirement age raised to his 50th. Ten years ago, the system was relatively new. “We are facing burnout due to increased workloads due to staffing shortages and increased service requests,” said Frank Campo, president of the New Hampshire Police Association. “The recent trend is that senior police officers are resigning and retiring at a pace never seen before. Last week, Gov. Chris Sununu said he was not in favor of spending.” “We have made great progress in changing and addressing some of the problems in the pension system, filling in holes,” said Sununu. said. “My concern is that these changes will undermine a lot of the positive progress that has been made so far.” I say it’s a thing. “If we can’t keep the most experienced police officers, it will affect every community in the state,” said Manchester Police Chief Allen Aldenberg.

Hundreds of first responders gathered in state legislatures on Tuesday to urge lawmakers to rectify what they say the retirement plan is wrong.

Funds to address this issue have just been removed from the budget.

This issue dates back to changes made to the system in 2011.

To fill the hole in the state budget, the benefits of some 1,800 as yet unvested civil servants were cut and the retirement age was raised to 50.

Ten years ago they were relatively new recruits, but now they form the core of a statewide department.

“We are facing burnout due to increased workloads due to staffing shortages and increased requests for service,” said Frank Campo, president of the New Hampshire Police Association. “The recent trend is that senior soldiers are resigning and retiring at a pace we have never seen before.

The House has earmarked $50 million in the budget to begin addressing the issue.

Gov. Chris Sununu said last week that he is not in favor of the spending.

“We have made great progress in changing and addressing some issues in the pension system, filling in holes, etc.,” Sununu said. “My concern is that these changes will undermine the many positive advances that have been made so far.”

For workers leaders, this is about fairness. Police chiefs say it’s a matter of custody.

“If we fail to retain the most experienced police officers, it will affect every community in the province,” said Manchester Police Chief Allen Aldenberg.



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