Ancestry should be considered when using triglycerides as cardiac metabolic biomarkers

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April 17, 2023

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Source/Disclosure

Disclosure:
One study author reports receiving consulting fees from Boehringer Ingelheim and Novo Nordisk. Meeks does not report related financial disclosures.


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Important points:

  • Triglyceride levels vary significantly among people of West African, East African, and European ancestry.
  • Other lipid markers were similar among ancestors.

Data from four large studies, including ancestry data, show “clear differences” in associations between known cardiometabolic risk factors and triglyceride levels in people of West African, East African, and European backgrounds. is shown.

Analysis of data from more than 32,000 people in sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, and the United States showed that triglyceride levels were useful in assessing triglyceride level values ​​as markers of cardio-metabolic health, including the risk of hypertension and type 2 diabetes. It was suggested that such ancestral differences should be considered.

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Triglyceride levels vary significantly among people of West African, East African, and European ancestry.
Image: Adobe Stock

“The relationship between triglyceride levels and these other cardiometabolic risk factors may differ between ethnic groups due to both genetic and environmental factors. Karlijn Meeks, PhD, MSc, A research fellow and colleague at the NIH Center for Genomics and Global Health wrote: eBio Medicine“Associations between triglycerides and cardiometabolic risk factors may differ even within the same ethnic group living in different geographical settings. To reflect national contextual factors such as general health-related behaviors, such as diet and physical activity.The role of triglyceride levels in cardiometabolic disorders and risk factors has been investigated by multiple Africans and Europeans living in different locations. It is unclear how they differ between populations of strains.”

Meeks and colleagues analyzed data from four cross-sectional studies: the African American Diabetes Mellitus Study, the Study on Obesity and Diabetes in African Immigrants, the Healthy Living in Urban Settings Study, and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. is. The study included participants of West African descent from sub-Saharan Africa (n = 7,201), the United States (n = 4,390), and Europe (n = 6,436), and participants of East African descent from sub-Saharan Africa. (n = 781), and people of European ancestry from the United States (n = 8,670) and Europe (n = 4,541).

“To assess whether the relationship between triglycerides and cardiometabolic disorders and risk factors differs among populations of African descent, we segregated West African ancestry from East African ancestry,” the researchers wrote.

The researchers used linear regression analysis to assess the association between triglycerides and cardiometabolic risk factors.

Median triglyceride concentrations were significantly higher in urban areas of East Africa compared to all other populations (median, 1.6 mmol/L). West African immigrants had the lowest median triglyceride levels (median, 0.62 mmol/L). However, other major lipid measures such as total cholesterol, HDL and LDL were similar among ancestors.

The researchers found that triglycerides and hypertension were significantly higher in participants of European descent (beta = 0.179; 95% CI, 0.156-0.203) compared with participants of West African descent (beta = 0.102; 95% CI, 0.086-0.118). We observed higher adjusted regression coefficients in relation to ). Similarly, the researchers found that participants of European descent (beta = 0.028; 95% CI, 0.027-03) had higher We found higher adjusted regression coefficients in relation to BMI. -016), similar to the relationship between triglycerides and waist circumference, P. .05 for all ancestry-trait interactions. The results persisted even after accounting for environmental differences within the ancestral group. Researchers noted less consistency among people of European descent.

The association between triglycerides and type 2 diabetes did not follow ancestral patterns.

“For most cardiometabolic disorders and risk factors, weaker associations were observed in West Africa compared to European populations. “The differences in ancestry may partly be due to differences in the genetic factors underlying triglyceride biology,” the researchers wrote. Environmental differences may reflect differences in health-related behaviors such as diet. is required.”



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